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MAG-Net Guest Blog: Media Justice League

by Rebecca Ohnemus [email protected] As an organization grows, they experience a certain amount of pain.  Organizers, allies and volunteers aren't always on the same page.  In fact, they rarely come in with the same experiences, education or goals.  Getting everyone on board often requires cultivating a mutual experience, developing a baseline of information and shaping momentum based on group conception.  

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Listen Up: PNS radio story about the Minneapolis Public Hearing goes National to over 460 stations

Future of the Internet: Public Hearing with FCC in Minneapolis Tonight Public News Service-MN MINNEAPOLIS, Minn. - Minneapolis will host the nation's first public hearing tonight on the future of the Internet. The Federal Communications Commission (FCC) has organized the town hall event in the wake of a high-profile proposal from tech giants Google and Verizon. The companies propose to leave "wired" Internet free and open, but allow corporations to manage the data flow on fast-growing wireless networks.

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Your chance to speak out on net neutrality – Thursday in Minneapolis

By Mary Treacy, TC Daily Planet August 18, 2010 Once again The UpTake steps to the plate!  The UpTake crew, mostly volunteers, will be on hand Thursday evening when media moguls, access advocates, journalists, librarians, entrepreneurs, and information mavens of every stripe --  just about anybody who has dipped a toe into the digital world - will gather for a public hearing on the future of the Internet, with two Federal Communications Commission (FCC) commissioners in attendance.  The hearing is Thursday, August 19, 6:00 p.m. in the South High School Auditorium, 3131 19th Avenue South, Minneapolis. 

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Will Minnesota step up to the plate on net neutrality?

August 17, 2010 | by Christopher Mitchell | Posted on www.tech.mn From the  BitTorrent-Comcast debacle and the FCC’s courtroom conflicts to Google’s talks with Verizon, public awareness around the principles of network neutrality has been on the upswing lately –  and for all the right reasons.

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Radio Bilingue: ¿QUIÉN CONTROLA LA RED? WHO CONTROLS THE NET?

 ¿QUIÉN CONTROLA LA RED? El Internet está fundado bajo el principio de neutralidad en la red, el cual garantiza que toda la información publicada sea tratada de la misma manera y puesta a disposición de todos. Sin embargo, las compañías de cable y teléfono que ofrecen servicios de banda ancha están buscando vender y comprar el privilegio de hacer que ciertos contenidos en línea estén disponibles más rápidamente que otros. ¿Qué significa esto para los usuarios latinos de internet, quienes ya enfrentan los obstáculos de la brecha digital? Este programa es parte de la serie “Conéctate,” que trata temas del Internet y la brecha digital.

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Tomorrow’s Minneapolis hearing on Internet’s future is public’s chance to speak up; FCC chairman has heard telecom’s side

Op-ed in www.minnpost.com By Amalia Deloney and Joshua Breitbart | Wednesday, Aug. 18, 2010 On Thursday, the Federal Communications Commission will be in Minneapolis for a public hearing on the future of the Internet. The big question now looming over this hearing is whether the fate of the Internet has already been decided behind closed doors before the FCC has heard what the public has to say.

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Rally at Google Headquarters Tomorrow, Friday August 13th

The Google and Verizon are facing a huge backlash against their plan to give corporate control over today's fair, open Internet. The media has trashed the deal as a giant corporate power-grab, and over 300,000 people, including you, have signed petitions calling on Google to drop this disastrous proposal.

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Google-Verizon Deal: The End of The Internet as We Know It

By Josh Silver - Huffington Post For years, Internet advocates have warned of the doomsday scenario that will play out on Monday: Google and Verizon will announce a deal that the New York Times reports "could allow Verizon to speed some online content to Internet users more quickly if the content's creators are willing to pay for the privilege." The deal marks the beginning of the end of the Internet as you know it. Since its beginnings, the Net was a level playing field that allowed all content to move at the same speed, whether it's ABC News or your uncle's video blog. That's all about to change, and the result couldn't be more bleak for the future of the Internet, for television, radio and independent voices. How did this happen? We have a Federal Communications Commission that has been denied authority by the courts to police the activities of Internet service providers like Verizon and Comcast. All because of a bad decision by the Bush-era FCC. We have a pro-industry FCC Chairman who is terrified of making a decision, conducting back room dealmaking, and willing to sit on his hands rather than reassert his agency's authority. We have a president who promised to "take a back seat to no one on Net Neutrality" yet remains silent. We have a congress that is nearly completely captured by industry. Yes, more than half of the US congress will do pretty much whatever the phone and cable companies ask them to. Add the clout of Google, and you have near-complete control of Capitol Hill. A non-neutral Internet means that companies like AT&T, Comcast, Verizon and Google can turn the Net into cable TV and pick winners and losers online. A problem just for Internet geeks? You wish. All video, radio, phone and other services will soon be delivered through an Internet connection. Ending Net Neutrality would end the revolutionary potential that any website can act as a television or radio network. It would spell the end of our opportunity to wrest access and distribution of media content away from the handful of massive media corporations that currently control the television and radio dial. So the Google-Verizon deal can be summed up as this: "FCC, you have no authority over us and you're not going to do anything about it. Congress, we own you, and we'll get whatever legislation we want. And American people, you can't stop us. This Google-Verizon deal, this industry-captured FCC, and the way this is playing out is akin to the largest banks and the largest hedge funds writing the regulatory policy on derivative trading without any oversight or input from the public, and having it rubber stamped by the SEC. It's like BP and Halliburton ironing out the rules for offshore oil drilling with no public input, and having MMS sign off. Fortunately, while they are outnumbered, there are several powerful Net Neutrality champions on Capitol Hill, like Nancy Pelosi, Harry Reid, Henry Waxman, Jay Rockefeller, Ed Markey, Jay Inslee and many others. But they will not be able to turn this tide unless they have massive, visible support from every American who uses the Internet --- whether it's for news, email, shopping, Facebook, Twitter --- whatever. So stop what you're doing and tell them you're not letting the Internet go the way of Big Oil and Big Banks. The future of the Internet, and your access to information depends on it. Author's note: Notice how a company can change their tune in the name of profitmaking. From Google in 2006: "Today the Internet is an information highway where anybody - no matter how large or small, how traditional or unconventional - has equal access. But the phone and cable monopolies, who control almost all Internet access, want the power to choose who gets access to high-speed lanes and whose content gets seen first and fastest. They want to build a two-tiered system and block the on-ramps for those who can't pay."   Follow Josh Silver on Twitter: www.twitter.com/freepress